lair.jpgDon’t you hate when people think you did something bad based on how they’d behave in the same situation?

Kids get this all the time. Take me. I wasn’t the greatest teenager, but my dad would always assume I partied too much, or brushed aside my homework because, he’d say, “I know how I was when I was your age.”

Well, sometimes he was totally wrong.

I started thinking about this after I received a survey about how many hiring managers think job applicants are fibbing when it comes to their resumes. But are bosses the real fibbers?

OfficeTeam, a staffing agency, just released the findings of a survey that asked the following of hiring managers:

“In your opinion, how often do job applicants include dishonest or exaggerated information on their resumes?”

Their responses:

Very often…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7%
Somewhat often…………………………………………………………………………………….. 36%
Not very often……………………………………………………………………………………….. 48%
Never……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8%
Don’t know……………………………………………………………………………………………. 1%

So, nearly half of those polled think you guys aren’t being totally honest.

I’m not surprised so many managers expect people to be lying. Many of them, it turns out, are expert liars.

If you’ve been awake during the last ten years, you’re probably aware of an endless stream of powerful liars that brought down our economy. And there’s some research that shows people in positions of power make better fibbers.

There’s old saying: power corrupts. A Columbia Business School study from last year titled “People with Power are Better Liars” found there may be truth behind the cliché.

“People in power are able to lie better,” said Dana Carney, a management professor at Columbia Business School and one of the co-authors of the study. “It just doesn’t hurt them as much to do it.”

For the average liar, she said, the act of lying elicits negative emotions, physiological stress and the fear of getting caught in a lie. As a result, she added, liars will often send out cues that they are lying by doing things like fidgeting in a chair or changing the rate of their speech.

But for the powerful, the impact is very different, according to the study:

“Power, it seems, enhances the same emotional, cognitive, and physiological systems that lie-telling depletes. People with power enjoy positive emotions, increases in cognitive function, and physiological resilience such as lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol. Thus, holding power over others might make it easier for people to tell lies.”

Since it’s easy for the bosses to lie, they may also think it’s easy for everyone else to lie.

Well, some of you rank and filers are also fudging the truth.

When OfficeTeam asked workers: “Do you know anyone who misrepresented or exaggerated information on his or her resume?”

The responses were:

Yes……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 21%
No………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 76%
Don’t know……………………………………………………………………………………………. 3%

OK, who doesn’t know if they’re lying? Are they lying about lying?

[Slashdot] [Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]