scam.jpgI’m feeling pretty popular this morning because I got five job offers in my email over the weekend.

Don’t be too jealous of me. All five offers are for the same job, even though the emails supposedly came from five different people. And all the five offers are unsolicited. I did not apply for any jobs at this company. If you’ve read any of the past stories I’ve written about job scams you’d know unsolicited offers are often scams.

These emails point to a huge problem on the Web. It’s easy for scammers, and legitimate companies, to find you, and there are few places people can go to figure out if they’re about to fall prey to a huckster. Even reporters have to work pretty hard to figure out what the heck is going on.

So, I put on my big reporter’s hat this morning to do some digging on these email “job offers”.

Maybe you got this one as well:

Great opportunity for energetic and enthusiastic individuals ready to move ahead in a great career!

World Wide Youth Exchange is currently seeking Exchange Co-ordinators nationwide to place and
supervise foreign exchange students for summer programs, as well as semester and academic year.

A good knowledge of how schools and the education system work
Excellent interpersonal skills in order to communicate with a range of different people
Good organisation and report writing skills
Good computer skills and MS Office knowledge
Internet access (at home or at work)
Minimum age requirement: 21 years
No criminal background

Great compensation ($15.50/hour), immediate start and your own working environment
are just a few of the benefits of this position.

Please send your resume to: Nellie@usa-totaljob.com

I suspected Nellie wasn’t really offering me this gig so I started snooping.

First I had to figure out where the email came from. There is no “USA-TotalJob.com” website, and no companies I could find under the name “World Wide Youth Exchange.” The email appeared to be coming from my own email account, but when I looked at the source of one of the emails I found it came from “0-sevice@gameduell.de.” The others had different emails including: “0-ka@sfg.com” and “0-ag@email.uophx.edu.” At least it appears like the email is coming from these sites.

It could all be part of an elaborate plan to get my email and sell it, or it’s one of many jobs scams out there.

Either way, you guys need to trash these emails even if you’re desperate for work. I know you want to answer them just to see what happens, but leave that to me. I’ll deal with the headaches that may ensue for the sake of journalism.

The fact that I responded my mean a flood of junk mail, but I’m willing to risk it.

Now I sit here waiting to see what happens. I’ve also contacted the Better Business Bureau to find out if they’ve looked into emails like this. I’ll update the post as soon as I get any information from “Nellie” or the BBB.

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