cursing.jpgIt’s really in to curse right now. Seriously!

I’ve noticed more people using profanity in social situations and cyber space is dripping with naughty language.

I got a tweet on Twitter yesterday about a new site that tracks cursing on Twitter called CurseBird. I’m serious. You can see everyone cursing on Twitter in real time.

Here’s a sampling: (Warning: Prepare for cursing)

Party at the Chemistry Lounge…100st and Liberty Avenue, Queens. Be there or be a fucking asshole!!

— SmartzWorld #1489787895 12 seconds ago

…oh, jesus. The cord just came out of my charger. It’s broken. And I’m on reserve battery power. *cries* oh, shit, shit, SHIT!

— thisisnerolilea #1489794494 just a moment ago

People seem more understanding lately about cussing.

This past weekend, NFL free agent Plaxico Burress unleashed a profanity tirade on a cop.

“F- - - you! You’re going to be in a lot of trouble. I know the sheriff personally,” he reportedly told a deputy sheriff that had stopped him for erratic driving.

This was the New York Post’s lead on the story:

At least this time Plaxico Burress was only shooting from the lip.

I guess it was much better than shooting off a gun, which is what Burress did last year at a nighclub when he accidentally shot himself in the thigh.

There is something freeing about being able to curse like a sailor, but alas, you may regret permanent, public displays of profanity when your career ship comes in.

What do you think happens when a hiring manager types in your name?

What if a hiring manager, or your boss for that matter, types in your name and FUCK or SHIT?

Let’s see what happens with my name:

OMG, the first item on Google is a CareerDiva post where I say, “fucking.”

Yikes. Who knew.

Anyway, you see my point, right?

Being a journalist, I sort of have a bit of leeway when it comes to cursing, especially if I’m using it to make a point. So, when I’m someday knocking on doors to get a job, I may be okay if a “fuck” here or a “shit” there comes up in a story I’ve written.

But you have to figure out if profanity connected to your name will help or hinder your job search, or your present gig.

I’m thinking a teacher or doctor might not benefit from such an association, just to name a few professions.

Now actors, they seem to be okay with a history of cursing.

Remember Christian Bale, who played Batman in the “The Dark Knight”?

I wrote about him a while back in my MSNBC.com column. He cursed out a poor camera man and was caught on tape.

Bale’s career seems to be doing okay. He’s starring in the new Terminator movie and everyone, including my hubby, is dying to see the flick.

Now don’t think I’m a prude. I’m all about free speech and cursing. And frankly I don’t get why people aren’t allowed to curse on network TV but they can show a bunch of pretty unsavory stuff in shows during prime time. I’d rather have my kids hearing cursing than watching killing.

I agree with Dayne Pratt, who wrote an opinion piece for a Northern Arizona University news site called, “Mom should’ve never washed your mouth out with soap”:

In the land of the free, in a building with a wall that depicts the words of the First Amendment to remind us of our rights to express ourselves freely through speech, religion, assembly and the press, shouldn’t we be allowed to say just a couple bad words?

Bad words, curse words, swear words, cuss words — they’re all the same, and they’re all harmless.

Alas, many people don’t see it that way. My dad was one of those people. He never spanked my older sister Vaso because she was the golden, first-born child. But when she dropped a curse word in front of him, whammo. He slapped her across her face. (Me he spanked a lot by the way.)

But I digress.

So, bottom line, cursing may be in vogue right now, but so was this outfit once upon a time: 80s-main_full.jpg

Do you want people digging this up when you apply for that dream job?

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