headhunter.jpgA story in Business Week contends you do indeed need a headhunter. And they’ve compiled a list of the most influential headhunters in the world to help all of you out there who are climbing the corporate ladder. (I know, hearing “the most influential in the world” anything sounds a bit far reaching, but hey everyone is going global today.)

We’re talking the top positions here. Not typically low-to-mid level manager type posts.

There is something to be said about having a headhunter as your go-between when you’re going for those big gigs, but I have found many of the leaders I’ve interviewed in my book got to where they are by making connections, connections with high level managers at a variety of companies.

In some ways this structure of connections has kept a lot of minorities and women from getting in on the top jobs, so I’m hopeful that the premise of this article is correct. If it’s true that you need these headhunters to move up then that must bode well for the individuals who have traditionally been kept out of the senior manager party. Why? Because a newcomer might have a chance.

Here’s a bit of the Business Week story:

You can’t get to the top without the headhunters. That’s as true for businesses as it is for established and emerging leaders. The world’s top headhunters control access to the lion’s share of C-suite succession and leader-replacement searches for the world’s largest corporations. Their influence also extends to the top ranks of the most ambitious smaller companies, which understand how crucial top talent is and are willing to pay for it.

OK, check out the story and the list of top recruiters. If you are a mid- or upper-level manager and you’re ready to move to a different company and move up, just call these people. What do you have to lose?

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